How to Recognize the Symptoms of Eating Disorders in Your Child

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Symptoms of Eating DisordersResearch has shown that life changes, such as the transitions to middle school, high school or college, can serve as triggers that may contribute to the development of an eating disorder. For this reason, Eating Recovery Center, an international center providing comprehensive treatment for anorexia, bulimia, EDNOS and binge eating disorder, encourages parents of children and adolescents making these life transitions to be vigilant for early symptoms of eating disorders.

"Children and adolescents who are high-achieving, perfectionists and who have highly sensitive temperaments are generally at a higher risk than other children for developing an eating disorder," said Julie Holland, MHS, certified eating disorders specialist and chief marketing officer of Eating Recovery Center. "For these individuals, unhealthy coping mechanisms may be utilized to manage the stressors associated with significant life changes."

A 2012 study from the Journal of Clinical Nursing found that significant transitional events, as well as a lack of support following traumatic life events, could serve as eating disorder triggers. Researchers identified school transitions as one of the six main factors that triggered eating disorders among the individuals who participated in the study.

Be Aware of These Symptoms of Eating Disorders

School transition experiences such as adapting to a new environment, meeting increased academic demands, struggling with social pressures and grappling with the physiological changes that occur during adolescence can create a perfect storm in which an individual with a highly sensitive temperament or a genetic predisposition for an eating disorder may turn to disordered eating behaviors as an anxiety management tool or coping mechanism.

To help parents manage their children’s transitions to new school environments, Eating Recovery Center highlights five back to school tips to help parents promote healthy attitudes about food and body shape and size.

  • Look for discreet warning signs. Although weight loss can be an indicator of disordered eating, it may not be immediately apparent. A child may be displaying symptoms of eating disorders if his or her schoolwork and grades begin to suffer, if he or she becomes socially withdrawn and increasingly anxious, tired and lethargic. Parents should also be aware if their child begins wearing roomier or layered clothing, even on warm days.
  • Avoid comments about your child’s body shape or size. When shopping for new school clothes avoid commenting on your child’s weight or body size and instead focus on his or her preferences regarding color, style, etc.
  • Have an honest conversation about peer pressure and the dangers of replacing food calories with alcohol calories if your son or daughter is getting ready to make the move to college. Discuss the physical consequences of disordered eating and drinking behaviors, such as liver damage from excessive alcohol consumption or the significant internal damage poor nutrition can cause.
  • Remind your teenage athlete not to overdo his or her training in an effort to make a high school sports team. Watch for signs of over-exercise, such as sports preparation when he or she is injured or sick, or exercise that significantly interferes with daily activities and schoolwork.
  • Be a positive body role model. When helping an adolescent recover from the body-focused bullying that can sometimes accompany going back to school, a parent who has positive body image will have far more credibility than one who consistently criticizes his or her own looks.

"It is important to remember that what triggers an eating disorder may not be what perpetuates it," said Holland. "Though school transition pressures may have precipitated an eating disorder, the factors that enable its continuation are often complex. Early intervention and treatment from qualified eating disorders professionals are essential to maximize opportunities for lasting recovery."

I'm a former 7th grade Science teacher turned stay-at-home mom that lives in Houston, Texas. I am married to my college sweetheart and have a beautiful daughter named Riley, who definitely keeps me on my toes! I am also involved in starting a small business which would both manufacture and sell an invention that I've patented, called Toothpaste 2 Go. I love interacting with my readers and hope to learn as much about you as you learn about me!

Melissa
Melissa @ Mommy Living the Life of Riley!
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3 Responses to How to Recognize the Symptoms of Eating Disorders in Your Child

    1

    As a social worker I have told many families how important it is not to criticize children about their body image. Children are self-conscious enough without getting ridicule from home and people they trust. Unfortunately it happens far to often and it can have a life long impact.

    Aaron
    dadblunders recently posted..Worry – Making A Better ParentMy Profile

      Melissa Says:

      2

      That’s so true Aaron. It seems that often well-meaning parents can end up doing significant damage to a child’s self-esteem. Thanks so much for the work you do to help families in need. Have a great weekend!

    3

    Good reminders. It’s so easy to over look so many of the warning signs!
    gina valley recently posted..FlyMy Profile

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